Prediabetes and diabetes

The Epidemic of Prediabetes and Diabetes!


According to a new study, investigators say diabetes and prediabetes will also account for an estimated 10 percent of total health care spending by the end of the decade at an annual cost of almost $500 billion. That's up from an estimated $194 billion in 2010.

The report, "The United States of Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in the Decade Ahead," was unveiled this week, because November is National Diabetes Prevention month. The study offers solutions designed to improve health and life expectancy, while also saving up to $250 billion over the next 10 years.

Read this report on CNN titled Diabetes or prediabetes predicted for half of Americans by 2020

What is Prediabetes and why is it important to reverse it for weight loss, and prevention of diabetes?

Prediabetes is a serious health condition that increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Yet the vast majority of people with prediabetes do not know they have the condition, according to CDC research.
  • Just 7% of people with prediabetes are aware of their condition.
  • 79 million Americans—35% of adults aged 20 years and older—have prediabetes.
  • Half of all Americans aged 65 years and older have prediabetes.


What is prediabetes?

People with prediabetes have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. They are at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems, including heart disease, and stroke. Without lifestyle changes to improve their health, 15% to 30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years.  

How can type 2 diabetes be prevented?

Research shows that modest weight loss and regular physical activity can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent in people with prediabetes. Modest weight loss means 5% to 7% of body weight, which is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. Getting at least 150 minutes each week of physical activity, such as brisk walking, also is important.


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Lifestyle change programs offered through the National Diabetes Prevention Program, which is led by CDC, can help participants adopt the healthy habits needed to prevent type 2 diabetes. Trained lifestyle coaches lead classes to help participants improve their food choices, increase physical activity, and learn coping skills to maintain weight loss and healthy lifestyle changes.  

Who Is likely to have prediabetes?

People with the following risk factors are more likely to develop prediabetes and type 2 diabetes:
  • 45 years of age or older.
  • Overweight.
  • Have a parent with diabetes.
  • Have a sister or brother with diabetes.
  • Family background is African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander.
  • Developed diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes), or gave birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more.
  • Physically active less than three times a week.

How to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.

  • Fasting glucose test. This measures blood glucose in people who have not eaten anything for at least eight hours. Fasting glucose levels of 100 to 125 mg/dL are diagnostic of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), also called prediabetes. People with IFG often have had insulin resistance for some time and are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes
  • Glucose tolerance test. This test measures blood glucose after people fast for at least eight hours, and two hours after they drink a sweet liquid provided by a doctor or laboratory. A blood glucose level between 140 and 199 mg/dL is called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) also called prediabetes. Like IFG, it points toward a history of insulin resistance and a risk for developing type 2 diabetes.
  • Hemoglobin A1c test. This test measures the amount of glucose that is on the red blood cells. Fasting is not necessary. An A1c value of 5.7% to 6.4% indicates prediabetes.
*People whose test results indicate they have prediabetes should have their blood glucose levels checked again in 6 months to 1 year.

Can We Reverse This Epidemic of Diabetes and Prediabetes?

Good news is that we can reverse insulin resistance with physician trained in the new field of Obesity Medicine that specializes in preventing and reversing insulin resistance. According to a new study co-authored by a University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) researcher and published online Dec. 19 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has shown that intensive lifestyle interventions, including diet and exercise, have the potential to put Type 2 diabetes into remission and eliminate the need for medication in some cases.

According to the American Diabetes Association, nearly two million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older in 2010. Since the grossly misleading food pyramid was introduced, the incidence of type 2 diabetes has gone up as much as 400 percent in the United States. Pre-diabetes, also called insulin resistance syndrome or metabolic syndrome, affects about a third of all Americans. If you have some extra weight especially around your waist, you might be insulin resistant! An obesity medicine physician specializing in the medical management of obesity and insulin resistance might be able to help. 

According to this report:

 "Reversing diabetes through weight loss and exercise is a much less invasive approach and may be a more attractive option for many people. This is very exciting news for supporters of public health policies that encourage people to lose weight and increase their physical activity."


How Can W8MD Medical Weight Loss Centers Of America Help?

W8MD weight loss physicians have specialized obesity medicine training and are well versed with  managing insulin resistance and other metabolic effects of weight.
W8MD physicians can help you lose weight safely, effectively using proven non surgical methods. Use this free W8MD's Insulin Resistance Calculator and see if you might be insulin resistant that may be causing your weight gain?   
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Call (800)W8MD-007 for more information or visit W8MD website for locations, insurances, and appointments.

Insulin Resistance Calculator


W8MD'S PHILADELPHIA WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAM AT 
POLY -TECH SLEEP SERVICES INCLUDE:
W8MD’s NYC Weight Loss, Sleep & Medspa
Manhattan, NY – 401 E 55th Street New York, NY 10022

Call 718-946-5500

Poly-Tech Sleep, W8MD’s Philadelphia Weight loss & Aesthetics NE Philadelphia
1718 Welsh Road, 2nd Floor, Philadelphia, PA, 19115

Call 215-676-2334

Poly-Tech Sleep, W8MD Weight Loss & MedSpa – King of Prussia, PA

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 Coming soon – W8MD Weight Loss, Sleep & Medical Spa Cherry Hill, NJ

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Frequently asked questions about insulin resistance and diabetes

  • How do you test for insulin resistance?
  • What is the main cause of insulin resistance?
  • Can you reverse insulin resistance?
  • What are the symptoms of being insulin resistant?
  • Does insulin resistance make it hard to lose weight?
  • Does insulin resistance cause weight gain?
  • What are the warning signs of prediabetes?
  • Are skin tags a sign of insulin resistance?
  • How can I fix insulin resistance naturally?
  • What foods to avoid if you are insulin resistant?
  • What foods spike insulin?
  • What foods can reverse diabetes?
  • What is the best medication for insulin resistance?
  • How can I lower my insulin levels?
  • Does eating too much sugar cause insulin resistance?
  • What comes first insulin resistance and obesity?
  • How can I reduce my stomach fat?
  • Does insulin stop fat burning?
  • What exercise is best for insulin resistance?
  • Are eggs good for insulin resistance?
  • Is oatmeal good for insulin resistance?

Glossary of terms

A1c - see HgA1C below
Amputation
A procedure to cut off a limb, such as a foot, from the body. See Non-Traumatic Lower-Limb Amputation. 
Beta Cell
A cell located in the pancreas that makes insulin.
Blood Glucose
The main sugar found in the blood and the body’s main source of energy.
Body Mass Index (BMI)
A measure used to evaluate body weight relative to a person’s height. BMI is used to find out if a person is underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese.
Chronic Kidney Disease
Any condition that causes reduced kidney function over a period of time. CKD is present when a patient’s glomerular filtration rate remains below 60 milliliters per minute for more than 3 months. CKD may develop over many years and lead to end-stage renal disease. Also see End-Stage Renal Disease.
Diabetes
A condition characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) resulting from the body’s inability to use blood glucose for energy. Also see Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes.
Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA)
An emergency condition in which extremely high blood glucose levels, along with a severe lack of insulin, result in the breakdown of body fat for energy and an accumulation of ketones in the blood and urine. Signs of DKA are nausea and vomiting, stomach pain, fruity breath odor, and rapid breathing. Untreated DKA can lead to coma and death.
Diabetic Retinopathy
Causes vision damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. Loss of vision may result, and is also called diabetic eye disease.
Diagnosed Diabetes
In the Diabetes Atlas application, a person is considered to have diagnosed diabetes if a doctor or other health professional had ever told that he or she had diabetes. Women who were told they only had diabetes during pregnancy are not considered to have diabetes.
End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)
Total and permanent kidney failure. When the kidneys fail, the body retains fluid. Harmful wastes build up. A person with ESRD needs treatment to replace the work of the failed kidneys.
Gestational Diabetes
A type of diabetes that only develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after delivery. It increases the mother’s risk of developing diabetes later in life. GDM is managed with meal planning, physical activity, and, in some cases, medication.
High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Cholesterol
A fat found in the blood that takes extra cholesterol from the blood to the liver for removal, sometimes called “good” cholesterol. Also see Blood Cholesterol.
Hemoglobin A1C Test
Measure of a person’s average blood glucose level over the past 2 to 3 months. Hemoglobin is the part of a red blood cell that carries oxygen to the cells and sometimes joins with the glucose in the bloodstream. The test shows the amount of glucose that sticks to the red blood cell, which is proportional to the amount of glucose in the blood. Results are given as a percentage or as an average glucose value.
Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State
An emergency condition in which one’s blood glucose level is very high and ketones are not present in the blood or urine. If not treated, it can lead to coma or death.
Hypoglycemia
Also called low blood glucose, a condition that occurs when one’s blood glucose is lower than normal, usually below 70 mg/dL. Signs include hunger, nervousness, shakiness, perspiration, dizziness or light-headedness, sleepiness, and confusion. If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to unconsciousness.
Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG)
A condition in which a fasting blood glucose test shows a level of glucose higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. IFG, also called prediabetes, is a level of 100 to 125 mg/dL. People with prediabetes are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.
Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT)
A condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but are not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. IGT, also called prediabetes, is a level of 140 to 199 mg/dL 2 hours after the start of an oral glucose tolerance test. People with prediabetes are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.
Insulin
A hormone that helps the body use glucose for energy. The beta cells of the pancreas make insulin. When the body cannot make enough insulin, insulin is taken by injection or other means.
Insulin Pump
This insulin-delivering device is about the size of a deck of cards and can be worn on a belt or kept in a pocket. An insulin pump connects to narrow, flexible plastic tubing that ends with a needle inserted just under the skin. Users set the pump to give a steady trickle or basal amount of insulin continuously throughout the day. Pumps release bolus doses of insulin at meals and at times when blood glucose is too high, based on doses set by the user.
Insulin Resistance
The body’s inability to respond to and use the insulin it produces. Insulin resistance may be linked to obesity, hypertension, and high levels of fat in the blood.
Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA)
A type of diabetes, usually first diagnosed after age 30, in which people show signs of both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Most people with LADA still produce their own insulin when first diagnosed and do not require insulin injections. Some experts believe that LADA is a slowly developing kind of type 1 diabetes because patients have antibodies against the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Several years after diagnosis, people with LADA must take insulin to control blood glucose levels.
Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity
In the Diabetes Atlas application, a person is considered to be physically inactive if he or she reported not participating in physical activity or exercise in the past 30 days.
Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol
A fat found in the blood that takes cholesterol around the body to where it is needed for cell repair and also deposits it on the inside of artery walls; sometimes is called “bad” cholesterol. Also see Blood Cholesterol.
Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY)
A monogenic (i.e., related to a single gene) form of diabetes that usually first occurs during adolescence or early adulthood.
Nephropathy
Disease of the kidneys causing damage that allows protein to leak out of the kidneys into the urine. Damaged kidneys can no longer remove wastes and extra fluid from the bloodstream.
Neuropathy
Disease of the nervous system that causes muscle weakness, pain, and numbness. The most common form of neuropathy in people with diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, which affects the legs and feet.
Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)
Fat in the liver which can lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis—a common liver disease that occurs in people who drink little or no alcohol—and chronic liver disease. NAFLD can be a complication of insulin resistance and diabetes.
Obesity
A condition in which a greater than normal amount of fat is in the body; more severe than overweight; having a body mass index of 30 or more. See Body Mass Index.
Prediabetes
A condition classified in people who have blood glucose or hemoglobin A1C levels higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. People with prediabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), also known as polycystic ovarian syndrome, is a common health problem caused by an imbalance of reproductive hormones. The hormonal imbalance creates problems in the ovaries. The ovaries make the egg that is released each month as part of a healthy menstrual cycle. With PCOS, the egg may not develop as it should or it may not be released during ovulation as it should be. PCOS can cause missed or irregular menstrual periods. Irregular periods can lead to: Infertility (inability to get pregnant). In fact, PCOS is one of the most common causes of infertility in women. Development of cysts (small fluid-filled sacs) in the ovaries
Type 1 Diabetes
A condition characterized by high blood glucose levels caused by a total lack of insulin. This occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. Type 1 diabetes develops most often in young people but can appear in adults.
Type 2 Diabetes
A condition characterized by high blood glucose levels caused by either a lack of insulin or the body’s inability to use insulin efficiently. Type 2 diabetes develops most often in middle-aged and older adults but can appear in children, teens, and young people.

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